Getting Energy

Drinking water is universally touted as a cure-all for nearly everything.

One true thing is that drinking water gives you energy.

It’s too late when you’ve gotten dehydrated. Drinking water throughout the day can help you halt a drop in energy.

One other thing that helped me get my energy was to cook eggs for breakfast. Instead of relying on quickie granola mush as an everyday staple.

A surprise change that had the most effect was to exercise for a shorter duration in each workout session.

For five years I’d been lifting weights for 50 minutes or more in each session. This left me wired and tired at the same time.

In the last year I’ve exercised for 30 to 45 minutes in each workout. Since the routine is short I go at a more intense burst.

I can see that I’m more fit today than when I was dead lifting 205 pounds in 2014.

The older you get I think you will need to change how you exercise and the kind of exercise you do.

Strength training will help you maintain your weight.

Getting fresh air can give you energy too.

This can be taking a walk around the block. Or walking to a street where there’s a bench and sitting down for even just 10 minutes outdoors in the sun.

Pairing your protein food source with a whole grain can give you more energy too according to “10 Ways to get More Energy” in the May issue of Harper’s Bazaar.

Foods rich in iron and iodine can help too as per this magazine article. Black beans, lentils, tofu, and kelp are iron-rich foods. Kelp also has iodine.

Interestingly, I read that sea salt is far better than the regular table salt so often used.

The Bailene fine sea salt can be poured into a salt shaker and used like regular salt.

Lastly I’ll quote the Bazaar article:

“A recent study found that consuming more fresh fruits and vegetables for just two weeks had significant mental health benefits with participants reporting that they felt more motivated.”

This according to Samantha Boardman, M.D.

Author: Chris Bruni

Christina Bruni is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Left of the Dial. She contributed a chapter "Recovery is Within Reach" to Benessere Psicologico: Contemporary Thought on Italian American Mental Health. As well as an author and activist, Bruni is an artist and athlete.

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