Care-Giving

I find it hard to engage in the stereotypical acts of self-care that are anything but true caregiving for yourself:

Light a candle. Take a bath. Have a glass of wine.

Numbing yourself isn’t freeing yourself of the daily hardship of life.

Lifting weights and eating mostly healthful food has been the only form of self-care I could adhere to long-term.

I’m getting older and act as my mother’s caregiver. Thus getting pulled away from posting blog entries every single week on the same day.

Thinking of this I realized that not every reader is aware that I used to post blog entries every Friday.

Does it really matter if I don’t post the blog entries on the same day every week?

I was told to Google “care for the caregiver” to find a support group for caregivers like me.

In early December I will be able to post a new set of Upper and Lower Body Workout Routines.

I’m grateful to see loyal followers joining and reading this humble blog.

What I’m going to do in the coming blog entries is to focus again on the topic of Living through the Pandemic – 21 months later.

My stance is that instead of parroting the often-white-influencer feel-good tropes of “self-care” that I don’t relate to:

My aim is to talk about “care-giving” to ourselves and others.

With the specific revelation of the life lesson I learned the hard way. After living for so long with a lack of energy.

I learned the secret to feeling lighter and freer.

As the pandemic drags on and continues to course through our lives:

I seek to give others hope for healing.

Self-Care 101

Like I wrote in here recently you have to expect that setbacks will happen. It’s not a matter of if but when you’ll experience a setback.

As this is true it’s imperative to adapt to the changes happening in your life. You need to be flexible and open to doing things differently.

Be flexible¬† while you’re experiencing the setback and in an ongoing way after the setback ends.

The point is if you ask me to change as you go along in your life.

Your needs will change as you get older.

It’s also critical to remember to be kind to yourself when you’re not at full speed and are unable to do what you were ordinarily able to do.

Be kind to yourself. As long as you’re doing the best you can there’s nothing to be upset about if you’re experiencing your own kind of retrograde period.

This setback time is perfect for editing and revising, taking stock of where you’ve been, thinking about where you want to go in the coming weeks and months.

We are all human. You and I might always mourn the passing of our “glory days” like the baseball pitcher in the Bruce Springsteen song “Glory Days.”

I’m here to tell you to have no fear: the best is always yet to be.

It’s possible to emerge on the other side of the setback stronger and more confident.

None of us can predict the specifics of our future lives.

Yet by taking consistent action to move forward in the direction of our goals we can bloom.

Yes: the best is yet to be. I firmly believe this.

Refrain from agonizing over what you’ve lost or haven’t been able to do.

As long as you wake up and God gave you another day it’s possible to make positive gains.

I’ll report in the next blog entry about setting up a home gym.